Report Analysis – How to Read the Statements

Learn how to read and understand the basic financial reports used by all businesses. From the balance sheet to the profit and loss statement, understand why the reports are organized in this fashion. Find out how a cash flows statement works and the value it brings to the reader of this report. Finally, understand how the equity section and the reports about ownership are used for a small business.

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Job Costing Reports – Introduction (Part 1)

Job Costing Reports

Job costing reports are management tools used to evaluate project or production performance against a known or estimated standard. They are used in many business sectors and their respective industries. The primary purpose of job costing reports is to identify discrepancies or beneficial results, usually in the form of financial values. They can be used to report both financial and numerical production outcomes.

Financial Statements for the Small Business

Financial Statements

Financial statements serve the purpose of presenting economic activity and status related to a particular date and over a particular time frame. Accountants record monetary transactions and via financial reports present the information in an easy to understand format. The financial statements for a small business do not have to comply with those of publicly traded operations.

Long Term Debt – Financial Statement Presentation

Long-Term Debt

Long Term Debt is one of the multiple forms of capitalizing a business. It includes bonds, secured notes and mortgage notes. In the world of small business, the most common form of long term debt is secured notes, most likely with recourse. As an owner of a business you need to understand how this information is presented in your financial statements.

Dividends and Distributions – Use in the Proper Context

Dividends and Distributions - Use in the Proper Context

Dividends and distributions refer to the payment of cash to investors. Why are there two separate terms? Well, the term is tied back to the type of entity that makes the payment. Simply stated, regular corporations, i.e. C-Corporations as identified in the Internal Revenue Code use the term ‘Dividends’ and S-Corporations (Small Business Corporations) use the term ‘Distributions’. In addition to S-Corporations, other closely held business use the term ‘Distributions’ to identify amounts disbursed to the respective owners or beneficiaries. These forms of entities include Partnerships, Limited Liability Corporations, Trusts and Estates. 

Although it appears relatively simple at first, it is slightly more involved than this and this article addresses the proper definition and context use when using these two similar terms. In addition, there are more differences between the two terms than just the source of the payment. For a full and detailed understanding of the terms, continue reading. 

Accelerated Depreciation – An Explanation

Accelerated Depreciation

When it comes to depreciation, no two businesses are alike. Unlike traditional straight line depreciation where the asset value is costed out to depreciation expense in equal increments over a given life expectancy, accelerated depreciation expenses the cost at higher values during the earlier accounting periods and at a lower amount towards the last half of the asset’s life expectancy.