Month: April 2014

Dividends and Distributions – Use in the Proper Context

Dividends and Distributions - Use in the Proper Context

Dividends and distributions refer to the payment of cash to investors. Why are there two separate terms? Well, the term is tied back to the type of entity that makes the payment. Simply stated, regular corporations, i.e. C-Corporations as identified in the Internal Revenue Code use the term ‘Dividends’ and S-Corporations (Small Business Corporations) use the term ‘Distributions’. In addition to S-Corporations, other closely held business use the term ‘Distributions’ to identify amounts disbursed to the respective owners or beneficiaries. These forms of entities include Partnerships, Limited Liability Corporations, Trusts and Estates. 

Although it appears relatively simple at first, it is slightly more involved than this and this article addresses the proper definition and context use when using these two similar terms. In addition, there are more differences between the two terms than just the source of the payment. For a full and detailed understanding of the terms, continue reading. 

Recourse and Nonrecourse Types of Loans

Recourse and Nonrecourse

When a lending institution loans money they mostly fear nonpayment of the debt. Often these loans were implemented due to a third party’s endorsement. To qualify the endorsement the bank may require the third party guarantee the debt. This is known as having ‘Recourse’ in getting the debt paid

Hair Stylist Compensation Model

Salon Compensation Model

One of the most fascinating business models is the hair salon industry. Many salons are poorly managed and rarely generate adequate profits. To make matters worse, the stylists are like professional sports players. One week they are playing for this team, and next week they are on a new team.  In effect, they switch salons.  It often happens because of personality conflicts, but the most common reason is that the grass is greener over at the other salon. That is; there is more compensation over at the other salon. How can this exist? How can one salon offer greater compensation than your salon? After all, they face the same economic barriers you deal with on a day to day basis. Given this, what is a fair compensation package? How do you create a model that not only entices better stylists but ensures adequate profit for your salon? This article is written to describe the current industry model, and then I’ll explain what is wrong with the model and finally how to change the model to create a fair compensation package for the stylist and still generate adequate profits for your salon.

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